The Economics of Mutuality – Part I

March 19, 2014 – Today, I attended a fascinating presentation by Jay Jakub of the . The team at Mars is proposing to push beyond the simple concept of triple bottom line – the accounting framework that tracks impact on people, planet, profit – in assessing business performance. Instead, they …

 

The Economics of Mutuality – Part II

Western Lens For one, thinkers and commentators from the West (or wealthier economies) have a disproportionate platform to propagate ideologies that may not be well-suited to other jurisdictions. For example, most ideas now about the rights of employees and businesses come from industrialized countries where governments, businesses and workers have …

 

Economics of Mutuality: Part III

No Reward for Business Risk As a start, a business must be profitable to take care of all its stakeholders. As soon as an entrepreneur cannot make payroll, pay suppliers, meet a loan payment to the bank or settle its taxes, all those stakeholders – supposedly bound by warm fuzzy …

 

Africa Rising: Fact or Fiction?

  From Time and the Economist to McKinsey and Forbes, most credible observers agree that a New Africa is emerging. Over the last two decades, Africa has gradually experienced a turnaround that now has several of its countries leading the world in growth and urbanization rates. Disposable incomes are growing …

 

Just Read: Illusions of Entrepreneurship – Part I

Research from Prof. Scott Shane of Case Western University reveals unexpected truths about start-ups. Common rhetoric is that public policy should aim to incubate new businesses, and nurture small ones, all in the belief that most jobs come from this sector. But closer examination shows that basically most start-ups offer …

#NewAfrica

 

Just Read: The Illusions of Entrepreneurship – Part II

Caution for Entrepreneurs Prospective entrepreneurs should also think hard before venturing into new businesses, especially if they are already gainfully employed. The data show that the most educated and experienced are able to find high-quality jobs, leaving entrepreneurship to people with fewer options. Most entrepreneurs start companies because they are …